Essays on the Common Man (Part I)

I Am the Common Man

I am what you would call the common man, and in hard times you could call me the invisible man.

I struggle to make ends meet, but pressure amounts and the problems never seem to diminish. When it rains, it pours, until I find myself trying to keep afloat in this lake of misery and mediocrity. And if, for the brief moment, I ever forget how to swim, I will surely drown.

It seems that my dire concerns become mainstream only when there is an election to be won; my personal hurdles become another match point, political prostitution and mockery, a blood sport prize.

I am the common man. I am a simple man, so my concerns are not otherwise fashionable. They are rather ordinary, unadorned, like the faded T-shirt and the weathered pair of jeans I wear on the weekends. Or, better yet, like the long-sleeved pin-striped collared shirts and gray pants I wear to work each day. Not at all like the confident cardigan sweaters that I wear on casual Fridays.

My struggles are not to be exploited, worn and shelved and worn again as the situation demands. They are not a pair of shoes to be polished only to then be retired and collect falling dust in the closet. I live with this back-breaking burden every day, like the daily tax for living. My struggles are a plea for relief, a cry to ease the burden that may one day cripple me.

I am the common man, driven by unwavering faith and untarnished optimism, despite these harsh trials. My driving faith keeps others moving. As long as my feet are planted firmly on this earth, I don’t have the option to lift my arms to the unmoving heavens in pitiful surrender. If my children see me weep and bellow in sorrow, they will lose faith in their own futures. If I fail to lift my weary head, they, too, will ignore the opportunities before them. Yes, I am the common man, but to my babies, to my darling wife and aging parents, I am an extraordinary man indeed.

Until the time when my travails become more than a footnote in modern political discourse, I will work tirelessly to ensure a more prosperous lifetime for the next generation. And though I may stub my toe, I will continue to trot onwards, toward fulfillment and happiness, because my uncolored commonness is my dazzling uniqueness. I am strong because I am in the company and fellowship of many other common men and women. I am the overworked, underpaid, overburdened, underrepresented man.

You may otherwise refer to me as the common man.

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